Query results: Cultivar names only


N: $[Drosera ' Albino ' {Borret & Farrow}]
P: J.Carniv.Pl.Soc. Autumn: (1989)
S: =[Drosera capensis {L.}]
B: R.Borret, Oxford; N.Farrow, Felixstowe, Suffolk, early 1988
Nominant: R.Borret & N.Farrow
Registrant: R.Borret & N.Farrow
HC: Registered 10. 11. 1998 {JS}
Description: J.Carniv.Pl.Soc. Autumn: (1989)
"After "growing-on" it became obvious that one plant was unusual for it presented a white flower and not the usual pink colour. The plant was propagated further by leaf cuttings and seed and was found to breed "true" (i.e. white flowers were produced). Another and probably more significant feature of the described form is the lack of red colouration in the leaves and tentacles under various lighting conditions, including strong sun."
Standard: Savage Garden:128 (1998), (only second plant from left)
Propagation: leaf cuttings & seed
Etymology: after the complete lack of anthocyanins
image: Check Bob Ziemer's Photo Finder
N: $[Drosera ' Ambrosia ' {B.Barnes}]
P: Carniv.Pl.Newslett.40:25 (2011)
S: =[[Drosera filiformis var. tracyi {Diels}] * [Drosera filiformis {Raf.}]]
GR: California Group {J.T.Robinson}
GRP: Carniv.Pl.Newslett.10:95 (1981)
B: B.Barnes, Longwood, Fla., US, 2007
Nominant: B.Barnes
Registrant: B.Barnes, 13. 9. 2010
C: synonym of [Drosera californica {Hort. ex Cheek}]
HC: Registered 3. 4. 2011 {JS}
Description: Carniv.PlNewslett.40:25 (2011)
"[Drosera ' Ambrosia ' {B.Barnes}] = (anthocyanin-free [Drosera filiformis var. tracyi {Diels}] x Florida all-red form of [Drosera filiformis {Raf.}]) retains many traits of the anthocyanin-free [Drosera filiformis var. tracyi {Diels}] parent including pale yellow leaves and colorless tentacles, but has the dark red glands of the Florida all-red
Standard: Carniv.Pl.Newslett.40:24 (second plant from right only!), 25 (fig.2) (2011)
Propagation: vegetative propagation by leaf cuttings and division
Etymology: after dark red nectar laden glands reminiscent of divine nectar drink
image: Check Bob Ziemer's Photo Finder
N: $[Drosera ' Big Easy ' {W.J.Clemens}]
P: Carniv.Pl.Newslett.33:84 (2004)
PW: www.carnivorousplants.org/cpn/Species/v33n3p83_89.html#easy
S: =[Drosera regia {Stephens}]
Introducer: W.J.Clemens, Tucson, Arizona, USA, obtained commercially from "Marie's Orchids", 2000
Nominant: W.J.Clemens
Registrant: W.J.Clemens, 16. 9. 2003
HC: Registered 30. 12. 2004 {JS}
Description: Carniv.Pl.Newslett.33:84 (2004)
"Under my cultural conditions this clone [Drosera ' Big Easy ' {W.J.Clemens}] has been just that, big and easy to grow and propagate. It produces leaves a maximum of 23 cm (9 inches) long. It has never gone dormant, never flowered or even initiated a flower stalk. Several times I have managed to propagate it from leaf cuttings floating in jars of pure water. It readily initiates buds and plants on any and all pieces of severed root. I have propagated hundreds of plants this way and have traded them widely. Other than its ease of cultivation, which is its most distinctive characteristic, its compact size is a distinctive characteristic of this cultivar."
Standard: Carniv.Pl.Newslett.33:87 (2004)
Etymology: after the ease of cultivation and propagation of this cultivar
image: Check Bob Ziemer's Photo Finder
N: $[Drosera ' California Sunset ' {Mazrimas}]
P: Carniv.Pl.Newslett.10:95 (1981)
PW: www.carnivorousplants.org/cpn/Species/v10n4p95.html
S: =[[Drosera filiformis {Raf.}] * [Drosera filiformis var. tracyi {Diels}]]
GR: California Group {J.T.Robinson}
GRP: Carniv.Pl.Newslett.10:95 (1981)
B: J.A.Mazrimas, spring 1973
Nominant: J.A.Mazrimas
Registrant: J.A.Mazrimas, 17. 7. 1980
C: synonym of [Drosera californica {Hort. ex Cheek}]
HC: Registered 10. 11. 1998 {JS}
Description: Carniv.Pl.Newslett.10:95 (1981)
"California grex (sic!) resulted from crossing [Drosera filiformis {Raf.}] * [Drosera filiformis var. tracyi {(Macf. ex Diels) Diels}]. The cross was originally made in spring 1973 when the parents bloomed at the same time. about 50 flowers were pollinated. In resulting hybrids leaves grow up to 0.5 m. long; tentacles are light red or deep pink in color. Flowers are large like [Drosera filiformis var. tracyi {(Macf. ex Diels) Diels}], color is rose pink and they are borne on tall scapes. Outer margins of flowers are scalloped. The anther lobes are separate and stamen filament is green. Hibernacula seem to be more hairy than [Drosera filiformis var. tracyi {(Macf. ex Diels) Diels}] and more like [Drosera filiformis {Raf.}]. [Drosera ' California Sunset ' {Mazrimas}] is the only selection thus far from the cross and it possesses characteristics of the group as a whole."
Standard: Carniv.Pl.Newslett.10:95 (1981)
Etymology: artificial hybrid raised in California
image: Check Bob Ziemer's Photo Finder
N: $[Drosera ' Caprice ' {Hort.Westphal}]
P: Carniv.Bestandsl.:2 (1991)
S: =[[Drosera aliciae {R.Hamet}] * [Drosera capensis {L.}]]
C: later synonym of [Drosera henryana {Hort.Weiner ex B.Pierson}]
HC: name not established (no description, violating Art.24.1., ICNCP)
image: Check Bob Ziemer's Photo Finder
N: $[Drosera ' Charles Darwin ' {I.Snyder}]
P: Carniv.Pl.Newslett.35:68 (2006)
S: =[Drosera rotundifolia {L.}]
B: I.Snyder, 10. 2001
Nominant: I.Snyder, Hermosa Beach, CA, USA, 3. 2005
Registrant: I.Snyder, 23. 2. 2005
HC: Registered 16. 10. 2006 {JS}
Description: Carniv.Pl.Newslett.35:68 (2006)
"Although D. rotundifolia may not be as clearly variable as Darwin's finches, there are certainly different ecotypes to be found. [Drosera ' Charles Darwin ' {I.Snyder}] was created by hybridizing two different parent forms of [Drosera rotundifolia {L.}] naturally found in California which I had originally collected in July, 1997. One parent (from Gasquet, Del Norte Co.; a lowland site) had a weak dormancy requirement, while the other was a larger plant (Willow Lake, N. Plumas CO.; a highland site). I had been cross pollinating these in an attempt to develop a plant more desirable for cultivation; in October 2001 I germinated a plant that exceeded all my expectations. Cultivate [Drosera ' Charles Darwin ' {I.Snyder}] as you would the tropical form of [Drosera anglica {Huds.}] from Hawaii. Like the Hawaiian plant, [Drosera ' Charles Darwin ' {I.Snyder}] grows continuously under typical indoor terrarium cultivation. Grown outdoors in temperate regions the plant will produce a protective winter bud as normal for [Drosera rotundifolia {L.}]. [Drosera ' Charles Darwin ' {I.Snyder}] seed is vigorous and viable, and germinates readily without a cold stratification period. In fact, if the seed is not promptly harvested and dried it often germinates while still in the seed capsule and then rots. While this makes it easy to sow the already germinating seedlings, it complicates the procedure of harvesting seed for storage. Plants flower readily without having to enter a dormancy period first. [Drosera ' Charles Darwin ' {I.Snyder}] has proven superior in cultivation to all known natural forms. In many growth trials, growers have remarked that it performs especially well indoors. Cultivation is easy via leaf cuttings. Furthermore, the cultivar's three hallmark traits, seed germination without cold stratification, year-round growth indoors, and ability to flower without having first gone through a dormancy period, are also preserved when the plant is propagated by seed, so the cultivar is available through the ICPS Seed bank."
Standard: Carniv.Pl.Newslett.35:69 (2006)
Propagation: possible by seed
Etymology: after Charles Darwin, who devoted most of his book "Insectivorous Plants" to [Drosera rotundifolia {L.}]
image: Check Bob Ziemer's Photo Finder
N: $[Drosera ' Cuba ' {D'Amato}]
P: Savage Garden:137 (1998)
S: =[Drosera intermedia {Hayne}]
Introducer: P.D'Amato, from Cuba
Nominant: P.D'Amato
HC: Registered 11. 6. 1999 {JS}
Description: Savage Garden:137 (1998)
"Tropical forms, such as those from Cuba, have smaller compact rosettes perfect for the terrarium."
Standard: Savage Garden:134 (1998), (second plant from left only)
Etymology: after the provenience of the plant
image: Check Bob Ziemer's Photo Finder
N: $[Drosera ' Dreamsicle ' {B.Barnes}]
P: Carniv.Pl.Newslett.40:25 (2011)
S: =[[Drosera filiformis {Raf.}] * [Drosera filiformis var. tracyi {Diels}]]
GR: California Group {J.T.Robinson}
GRP: Carniv.Pl.Newslett.10:95 (1981)
B: B.Barnes, Longwood, Fla., US, 2007
Nominant: B.Barnes
Registrant: B.Barnes, 13. 9. 2010
C: synonym of [Drosera californica {Hort. ex Cheek}]
HC: Registered 3. 4. 2011 {JS}
Description: Carniv.Pl.Newslett.40:25 (2011)
"[Drosera ' Dreamsicle ' {B.Barnes}] = (Florida all-red form of [Drosera filiformis {Raf.}] x anthocyanin-free [Drosera filiformis var. tracyi {Diels}]) exhibits the pale-yellowish leaf color of the anthocyanin-free [Drosera filiformis var. tracyi {Diels}] parent combined with the coloration of the other [Drosera filiformis {Raf.}] parent. However, the leaves, tentacles and glands take on a fiery-orange coloration, giving
Standard: Carniv.Pl.Newslett.40:24 (second plant from left only!), 25 (fig.3) (2011)
Propagation: vegetative propagation by leaf cuttings and division
Etymology: after the fiery-orange tentacles and glands reminiscent of a glowing orange popsicle or "creamsicle" as it is called
image: Check Bob Ziemer's Photo Finder
N: $[Drosera ' Emerald's Envy ' {W.J.Clemens}]
P: Carniv.Pl.Newslett.35:12 (2006)
S: =[Drosera capillaris {Poir.}]
Introducer: W.J.Clemens, from near U.S. Naval Hospital, Pensacola, Fla., US, 28. 1. 1986
Nominant: W.J.Clemens, Tucson, Az., USA, 2004
Registrant: W.J.Clemens, 4. 12. 2004
HC: Registered 3. 6. 2006 {JS}
Description: Carniv.Pl.Newslett.35:12 (2006)
"This plant, which I am naming [Drosera ' Emerald's Envy ' {W.J.Clemens}], can be distinguished from other [Drosera capillaris {Poir.}] plants by the following features. The entire leaf petiole and blade exhibit light to medium green coloration, even when grown in strong artificial light or full sunlight. Other [Drosera capillaris {Poir.}] plants, if grown under low light levels, may appear similarly colored, so it is important to compare only plants grown in high light levels. Furthermore, the flowers of [Drosera ' Emerald's Envy ' {W.J.Clemens}] are white--a somewhat unusual color (although white-flowered plants are occasionally encountered in the wild). Mature plants range between 2.5 and 4.0 cm in diameter when grown in strong light, but may be even larger if grown in lower light levels. [Drosera ' Emerald's Envy ' {W.J.Clemens}] may be propagated by seed or vegetative means, but no matter how the plant is propagated, in order to retain the name [Drosera ' Emerald's Envy ' {W.J.Clemens}], the progeny must exhibit the light green leaf color, white flower color, and maintain the form of the standard, even when grown under conditions of strong light (including full sun). [Drosera ' Emerald's Envy ' {W.J.Clemens}] is a tender perennial, persisting throughout the year. My current colony (planted among several pots) has been growing continuously since germinating in December of 2000."
Standard: Carniv.Pl.Newslett.35:32 (2006)
Propagation: by seed or vegetative means
Etymology: the plant is predominantly green as are emeralds
image: Check Bob Ziemer's Photo Finder
N: $[Drosera ' Florida Giant ' {D'Amato}]
P: Savage Garden:138 (1998)
S: =[Drosera filiformis {Raf.}]
Introducer: P.D'Amato, from Fla.
Nominant: P.D'Amato
HC: name not established (no description, violating Art.24.1., ICNCP), not to be confused with [Drosera ' Giant ' {D'Amato}]
Standard: Savage Garden:138 (1998)
Etymology: after the provenience and the size of the plant
image: Check Bob Ziemer's Photo Finder
N: $[Drosera ' Giant ' {D'Amato}]
P: Savage Garden:140 (1998)
S: =[Drosera binata {Labill.}]
Introducer: P.D'Amato
Nominant: P.D'Amato, 1998
HC: Registered 11. 6. 1999, not to be confused with [Drosera ' Florida Giant ' {D'Amato}]
Description: Savage Garden:140 (1998)
"this is one of the most massive of [Drosera {L.}]. The leaves are olive to bronzy yellow, with nearly transparent tentacles and pink glands. The wiry petioles can be 30 cm (one foot) in length, and the leaves branch from four to twelve points, sometimes 60 cm (two feet) in diameter. (...) A superb flycatcher, this species has a brief winter dormancy and is as cold-tolerant as [Drosera binata {Labill.}]. Outdoors in full sun, the leaves are colorful, smaller, and held erect. The flowers are white and best removed. The larger the pot, the more massive the plants become."
Standard: Savage Garden:141 (1998)
Etymology: after the size of the plant
image: Check Bob Ziemer's Photo Finder
N: $[Drosera ' Golden Dew ' {S.Fretwell, G.Bourke & S.Spence}]
P: Vic.Carniv.Pl.Soc.101:5 (2011)
S: =[Drosera whittakeri subsp. aberrans {Lowrie ex Lowrie & Carlquist}]
Introducer: S.Fretwell, Berwick, Vic., AU, from near the township of Maldon, Vic., AU, 7. 2004
Nominant: S.Fretwell, 2004
Registrant: S.Fretwell, 7. 10. 2011
HC: Registered 20. 10. 2011 {JS}
Description: Vict.Carniv.Pl.Soc.101:5 (2011)
"[Drosera 'Golden Dew' {S.Fretwell, G.Bourke & S.Spence}] is a perennial anthocyanin free tuberous plant that grows in a rosette 3-4cm in diameter. It differs from the typical form of [Drosera whittakeri subsp. aberrans {Lowrie ex Lowrie & Carlquist}] by exhibiting lime-green to green spathulate leaves with white, yellow or pale orange glands at the end of clear, to translucent yellow tentacles. In contrast the typical form consistently displays red glands on clear to red tentacles with green to red leaves.
Standard: Vict.Carniv.Pl.Soc.101:Front Cover, 4-6, Back Cover (2011)
Propagation: tuber division
Etymology: after golden colouration of glands and tentacles of plant
image: Check Bob Ziemer's Photo Finder
N: $[Drosera ' Hawaii ' {D'Amato}]
P: Savage Garden:142 (1998)
S: =[[Drosera linearis {Goldie}] * [Drosera rotundifolia {L.}]]
Introducer: P.D'Amato, from Kauai, Hawaii
Nominant: P.D'Amato, 1998
C: later synonym of [Drosera anglica {Huds.}]
HC: registration preliminary (standard missing)
Description: Savage Garden:136 (1998)
"An unusual colony is found in Hawaii on the island of Kauai. These plants are tropical, smaller in stature, and do not go dormant, making them ideal for terrariums."
Etymology: after the provenience of the plant
image: Check Bob Ziemer's Photo Finder
N: $[Drosera ' Hong Kong ' {D'Amato}]
P: Savage Garden:129 (1998)
S: =[Drosera spatulata {Labill.}]
Introducer: ?P.D'Amato, from Hong Kong
Nominant: ?P.D'Amato
HC: name not registered with ICRA, description insufficient
Description: Savage Garden:129 (1998)
"[Drosera ' Hong Kong ' {D'Amato}] forms have rosettes about 2.5 cm (one inch) across, with pink or white blooms."
Etymology: after the provenience of the plant
image: Check Bob Ziemer's Photo Finder
N: $[Drosera ' Ivan's Paddle ' {I.Snyder}]
P: Carniv.Pl.Newslett.37:22 (2008)
S: =[[[Drosera linearis {Goldie}] * [Drosera rotundifolia {L.}]] * [Drosera rotundifolia {L.}]]
B: I.Snyder, Inglewood, CA, USA, 7. 2001
Nominant: I.Snyder
Registrant: I.Snyder, 24. 7. 2007
C: later synonym of [Drosera anglica {Huds.}]
HC: Registered 12. 6. 2008 {JS}
Description: Carniv.Pl.Newslett.37:22 (2008)
"This new cultivar is a manmade selection that differs in two ways from the typical hybrid found in nature. Firstly, this selection is a tropical grower which makes it most suitable for cultivation. The [Drosera anglica {Huds.}] parent was a tropical form I previously selected from crossing the tropical Hawaiian strain with a larger temperate one from northern California. Although beautiful, the typical [Drosera obovata {Mert. & Koch}] invariably disappoints growers because of its winter dormancy requirement. Secondly, this [Drosera obovata {Mert. & Koch}] differs in being fertile."
Standard: Carniv.Pl.Newslett.37:25 (2008)
Propagation: leaf cuttings, division
Etymology: after the breeder and the leaf form
image: Check Bob Ziemer's Photo Finder
N: $[Drosera ' Kansai ' {D'Amato}]
P: Savage Garden:129 (1998)
S: =[[Drosera rotundifolia {L.}] * [Drosera spatulata {Labill.}]]
Introducer: K.Kondo, from Kansai, Japan
Nominant: K.Kondo, Hiroshima, 1971
C: later synonym of [Drosera tokaiensis {(Komiya & Shibata) T.Nakamura & Ueda}]
HC: coextensive with [Drosera kansaiensis {Debbert}], registered 10. 11. 1998 {JS}
Description: Sendnera 3:101 (1996), protologue of [Drosera kansaiensis {Debbert}]
Standard: Savage Garden:134 (1998), (second plant from right only)
Etymology: after the provenience of the plant
image: Check Bob Ziemer's Photo Finder
N: $[Drosera ' Kanto ' {D'Amato}]
P: Savage Garden:129 (1998)
S: =[Drosera spatulata {Labill.}]
Introducer: K.Kondo, from Kanto, Japan
Nominant: K.Kondo, Hiroshima, 1971
HC: Registered 10. 11. 1998 {JS}
Description: Savage Garden:129 (1998)
"[Drosera ' Kanto ' {D'Amato}], also from Japan, is very attractive with narrow, wedge-shaped leaves."
Standard: Savage Garden:134 (1998), (plant on extreme left only)
Etymology: after the provenience of the plant
image: Check Bob Ziemer's Photo Finder
N: $[Drosera ' Kununurra ' {D'Amato}]
P: Savage Garden:146 (1998)
S: =[Drosera ordensis {Lowrie}]
Introducer: A.Lowrie, from Kununurra, W.A.
Nominant: A.Lowrie, before 1994
HC: registration preliminary (standard missing)
Description: Savage Garden:146 (1998)
"The rosettes are 7.6-15.2 cm (three to six inches) in diameter and can form clumps over 30 cm (a foot) across. the leaves are erect with long, wide petioles so densely covered in silvery hairs that they appear white. The small, circular traps are golden green. Large flowers can be pink or white."
Etymology: after the provenience of the plant
image: Check Bob Ziemer's Photo Finder
N: $[Drosera ' Leo Bourke ' {G.Bourke}]
P: Carniflora Australis 7(3):4 (2010)
S: =[[[Drosera dielsiana {Exell & Laundon}] * [Drosera nidiformis {Debbert}]] * [Drosera natalensis {Diels}]]
B: G.Bourke, Corrimal, NSW, AU, 2004
Nominant: G.Bourke, 2010
Registrant: G.Bourke, 12. 6. 2010
HC: Registered 29. 6. 2011 {JS}
Description: Carniflora Australis 7(3):4 (2010)
"It forms a large semi erect rosette of 6-9cm. The leaves are"
Standard: Carniflora Australis 7(3):4 (2010), only plant in center
Propagation: root or leaf cuttings
Etymology: after originator's grandfather
image: Check Bob Ziemer's Photo Finder
N: $[Drosera ' Marston Dragon ' {Hort.Slack}]
P: Insect-Eat.Pl. & How to Grow Them:52 (1986)
S: =[Drosera binata {Labill.}]
B: A.Slack, Somerset, 1983
Nominant: A.Slack
Registrant: A.Slack
HC: Registered 29. 1. 2001 {JS}
Description: Insect-Eat.Pl. & How to Grow Them:52 (1986)
"Hybrid seedlings between the varieties (of [Drosera binata {Labill.}]) are seldom satisfactory, and I was fortunate in selecting one solitary seedling in 1983 which has proved itself to be of exceptional quality, and which I have named [Drosera ' Marston Dragon ' {Hort.Slack}]. Its pendulous stems are up to 36 cm (14 1/4 inches) long and bearblades the segments of which are as wide as those of [Drosera binata var. dichotoma {(Banks & Soland. ex Sm.) Mazrimas}], and are the largest I have seen in this section. They divide irregularly into two to eight points and are the same yellowish green as in [Drosera dichotoma {Banks & Soland. ex Sm.}] (sic!), but the reddish pink tentacles render them more attractive. A curious characteristic of the blade is the manner in which the segments spread sideways, often to a great length, the points curving round and clutching the air like talons, the whole reminding one very much of the feet of a chinese dragon. The flowers are large and are borne on long straight scapes, but again hardly seem to suit the weeping habit, especially if the plant is in a hanging basket, and I always remove them. In every respect I advise the same treatment as for [Drosera binata f. extrema {Hort. ex Gilbert}] (nom.nud.)."
Standard: Carniv.Pl.Newslett.29:105 (2000)
Etymology: after the originator's establishment Marston Exotics, Somerset, England
image: Check Bob Ziemer's Photo Finder
N: $[Drosera ' Nagamoto ' {Kusakabe}]
P: Carniv.Pl.Newslett.8:54 (1979)
S: =[[[Drosera linearis {Goldie}] * [Drosera rotundifolia {L.}]] * [Drosera spatulata {Labill.}]] /[[[Drosera linearis {Goldie}] * [Drosera rotundifolia {L.}]] * [[Drosera rotundifolia {L.}] * [Drosera spatulata {Labill.}]]]
XN: 40 {Kondo & Segawa}, (43), 50 {Kondo}
XNP: La Kromosomo II-51-52:1702 (1988), J.Jap.Bot.48:194 (1973)
B: J.Nagamoto, 24. 6. 1971
C: /synonym of [Drosera nagamotoi {Cheek}]
HC: name not established (no description, violating Art.24.1., ICNCP)
image: Check Bob Ziemer's Photo Finder
N: $[Drosera ' Narrow Leaf ' {D'Amato}]
P: Savage Garden:129 (1998)
S: =[Drosera capensis {L.}]
image: Check Bob Ziemer's Photo Finder
N: $[Drosera ' Plains Form ' {Slack}]
P: Insect-Eat.Pl. & How to Grow Them:44 (1986)
S: =[Drosera aliciae {R.Hamet}]
Introducer: F.Woodvine, from Kleinrivierberge, ZA
Nominant: A.Slack
Registrant: A.Slack
HC: name not established, epithet illegitimate (violating Art.19.19., ICNCP)
Description: Insect-Eat.Pl. & How to Grow Them:44 (1986)
"Growing on plains not far from this mountain (Kleinrivierberge), Mr Woodvine discovered another distinct sundew known at present under the temporary (!) name of D. sp. ' Plains Form ', but though there are differences in the flower I think it is near enough to [Drosera aliciae {R.Hamet}] to be considered a form of that species. The leaf rosettes are slightly smaller than in the typical form of the [Drosera aliciae {R.Hamet}], however, and the flower is of an especially delicate shade of mauve-pink. Treat and propagate as for [Drosera aliciae {R.Hamet}]."
Etymology: after the habitat the plants were collected from
image: Check Bob Ziemer's Photo Finder
N: $[Drosera ' Portland Sunrise ' {J.Brittnacher & D.Crawford}]
P: Carniv.Pl.Newslett.43:27 (2014)
S: =[[Drosera filiformis {Raf.}] * [Drosera filiformis var. tracyi {Diels}]]
GR: California Group {J.T.Robinson}
GRP: Carniv.Pl.Newslett.10:95 (1981)
Introducer: D.Crawford, Forest Grove, Oregon, US, 2006 or 2007
Nominant: J.Brittnacher & D.Crawford, 2013
Registrant: J.Brittnacher & D.Crawford, 27. 9. 2013
C: synonym of [Drosera californica {Hort. ex Cheek}]
HC: Registered 15. 5. 2014 {JS}
Description: Carniv.Pl.Newslett.43:27 (2014)
"[Drosera ' Portland Sunrise ' {J.Brittnacher & D.Crawford}] is an apparent hybrid between [Drosera filiformis {Raf.}] and [Drosera filiformis var. tracyi {(Macf.) Diels}] that resembles [Drosera filiformis {Raf.}] more than the horticultural hybrid [Drosera ' California Sunset ' {Mazrimas}] (...). The exact history of the plant is not known. In 2006 or 2007, Djoni purchased a plant labeled "Florida Giant Dewthread" from a vendor at the Portland Saturday Market and planted it in her backyard bog. She was told it was sterile. After a few years it spread to a large area in her bog via seeds. Upon further investigation and comparison with another plant purchased from the same vendor at the Portland Saturday Market in 2012, she found that her plants were redder and shorter than expected for [Drosera ' Florida Giant ' {D'Amato}], the plant name specified on the original label. The flowers are typical of [Drosera californica {Hort. ex Cheek}], although they are smaller than those of [Drosera ' Florida Giant ' {D'Amato}]. We have not compared them side-to-side with [Drosera ' California Sunset ' {Mazrimas}]. In 2013, when Djoni donated seeds from her plants to the ICPS Seed Bank, John queried her as to exactly what they were so they could be listed correctly. She sent him photos and some plants weeded out of her bog. We decided to list them as [[Drosera filiformis {Raf.}] * [Drosera filiformis var. tracyi {(Macf.) Diels}] ]while the plants were studied further.
Standard: Carniv.Pl.Newslett.43:27, 28 (2014)
Etymology: after plants that appear to have been selected by Portland winters to survive cold conditions
image: Check Bob Ziemer's Photo Finder
N: $[Drosera ' Rhodesian Beauty ' {W.Dawnstar}]
P: Carniv.Pl.Newslett.33:89 (2004)
PW: www.carnivorousplants.org/cpn/Species/v33n3p83_89.html#beauty
S: =[[Drosera ?] * [Drosera ?]]
Introducer: W.Dawnstar, New York, USA, from Africa (origin unknown)
Nominant: W.Dawnstar
Registrant: W.Dawnstar, 18. 12. 2003
HC: Registered 30. 12. 2004 {JS}
Description: Carniv.Pl.Newslett.33:89 (2004)
"This beautiful plant has numerous leaves and tentacles on a short stem. It retains each leaf for a long time, giving the plant a lush appearance. The petioles of the plant widen gradually and uniformly in a narrowly spathulate fashion. In good light the plant is a uniform golden green, with deeply red-colored glands. Lower light conditions will result in plants that are a deeper green, although the glands will stay red maintained. Although only the top three layers of leaves have active dew production, the lower layers of leaves retain their red and green coloration well."
Standard: Carniv.Pl.Newslett.33:88 (2004)
Propagation: best done vegetatively (leaf cuttings)
Etymology: after a (possibly wrong) label name of the plant
image: Check Bob Ziemer's Photo Finder
N: $[Drosera ' Ruby Slippers ' {W.J.Clemens}]
P: Carniv.Pl.Newslett.33:52 (2004)
PW: www.carnivorousplants.org/cpn/Species/v33n2p52_55.html#slippers
S: =[Drosera spatulata {Labill.}]
Introducer: W.J.Clemens, Tucson, AZ, US, from Kowloon Peak, CN, 12. 2000
Nominant: W.J.Clemens
Registrant: W.J.Clemens, 18. 3. 2003
HC: Registered 8. 9. 2004 {JS}
Description: Carniv.Pl.Newslett.33:52 (2004)
"The entire leaf petiole and blade exhibit dark maroon to burgundy coloration when grown in strong light, though they can exhibit more green if grown in a reduced light environment. Mature plants reach 2.5cm in diameter in strong light, but may be somewhat larger if grown in lower light levels. The underside of the leaves are covered with long (3-4mm) white hairs, parallel to the petiole, and which are visible on the newly forming leaves before then unfurl and on the underside of fully formed leaves. The leaves are wedge shaped having a very short petiole in proportion to the leaf blade, very reminiscent of [Drosera brevifolia {Pursh}], though larger, and more robust in appearance. They are tender perennials, persisting throughout the year."
Standard: Carniv.Pl.Newslett.33:33 (2004)
Propagation: preferably vegetative
Etymology: after the shape and colour of the leaves
image: Check Bob Ziemer's Photo Finder
N: $[Drosera ' Tamlin ' {W.Dawnstar}]
P: Carniv.Pl.Soc.J.(UK) 26:19 (2003)
S: =[Drosera spatulata {Labill.}]
B: W.'Tamlin' Dawnstar, Oswego, NY, US, 2001
Nominant: W.Dawnstar, 2003
Registrant: W.Dawnstar, 2004
HC: Registered 1. 6. 2004 {JS}
Description: Carniv.Pl.Soc.J.(UK) 26:19 (2003)
"This large-growing specimen of [Drosera {L.}] entered my collection in 2001 from seed sent to me as misidentified as a "superhairy" kind of [Drosera montana var. tomentosa {(St.Hil.) Diels}]. After seeing the mature plant did not conform to this identification, I sought to learn its identity through many enquiries to the international carnivorous plant community, which included such notables as Dr. Barry Rice, Dr. Jan Schlauer, Fernando Rivadavia, Dr. Miloslav Studnicka, Vitor Oliveira de Miranda, Ivan Snyder, and Robert Gibson. Most opinions were uncertain based on the nature of the plants atypical appearance, and the lack of flowers and scape at the time the enquiries were made. Robert Gibson was able to provide a positive determination once the plant showed its white flowers, and in August 2002 wrote, "I suspect they are indeed [Drosera spatulata {Labill.}] -- the clincher is in the photo of the flower. An older flower, below the open one, has sepal tips that have not closed back over the top of the fruit. This seems to be only found in [Drosera spatulata {Labill.}], but is not always developed. The leaf shape, colour and base of scape, plus flower structure all agree with [Drosera spatulata {Labill.}]." Ivan Snyder and Greg Bourke, familiar with this species mentioned that it resembled the plants they had seen growing on Fraser Island (Queensland, Australia). This plant is distinguished by its large form: it grows up to 7 cm in diameter, and up to 7 cm high. The leaves that form in the centre of the plant have a slight undulation and arch, being held initially erect, and later becoming decumbent in persistent layers. This habit raises the center of the plant at maturity up to 7 cm from the surface of the substrate (see Figure A). The rosettes of mature plants never lie flat against the substrate. In general habit it is similar to [Drosera venusta {P.Debbert}], for which it was initially mistaken by many experts. The flower of [Drosera ' Tamlin ' {W.Dawnstar}] is white. In strong light the plant attains a deep orange-red colouration overall, and is well coloured even in lower light conditions of terraria. Seedlings produced by self-pollination maintain this cultivar's unnique characteristics. As such, this cultivar may be propagated both by seed and vegetative means. This plant does not present any particular cultivation challenges: it is a tropical plant that requires no dormancy, and produces large amounts of seed. Vegetative propagation has not yet been attempted. The plant is long-lived - the original plant of this cultivar I obtained two years ago is still thriving in my collection."
Standard: Carniv.Pl.Soc.J.(UK) 26:back cover (2003)
Etymology: after the internet nickname (after a folk hero of Celtic legend) of the introducer
image: Check Bob Ziemer's Photo Finder
N: $[Drosera ' Watari ' {Kusakabe}]
P: Carniv.Pl.Newslett.8:54 (1979)
S: =[[[Drosera linearis {Goldie}] * [Drosera rotundifolia {L.}]] * [Drosera spatulata {Labill.}]]
B: J.Nagamoto, 9. 6. 1974
C: synonym of [Drosera nagamotoi {Cheek}]
HC: name not established (no description, violating Art.24.1., ICNCP)
image: Check Bob Ziemer's Photo Finder
N: $[Drosera ' Woolly Beast ' {B.Barnes}]
P: Carniv.Pl.Newslett.40:26 (2011)
S: =[[Drosera kenneallyi {Lowrie}] * [Drosera lanata {K.Kondo}]]
GR: Brian Barnes Group {B.Barnes}
GRP: Carniv.Pl.Newslett.40:26 (2011)
B: B.Barnes, Longwood, Fla., US, 2007
Nominant: B.Barnes
Registrant: B.Barnes, 13. 9. 2010
HC: Registered 3. 4. 2011 {JS}
Description: Carniv.Pl.Newslett.40:26 (2011)
"All of the resulting seedlings immediately showed hybrid vigor, along with the combined traits of the parents in various degrees of intensity. A greener hirsute form that favored the green [Drosera lanata {K.Kondo}] parent ([Drosera ' Woolly Beast ' {B.Barnes}])"
Standard: Carniv.Pl.Newslett.40:26 (fig.5, right, fig.6 left) (2011)
Propagation: vegetative propagation by leaf cuttings and division
Etymology: after visible attributes of the plants
image: Check Bob Ziemer's Photo Finder
N: $[Drosera ' Woolly Red ' {B.Barnes}]
P: Carniv.Pl.Newslett.40:26 (2011)
S: =[[Drosera kenneallyi {Lowrie}] * [Drosera lanata {K.Kondo}]]
GR: Brian Barnes Group {B.Barnes}
GRP: Carniv.Pl.Newslett.40:26 (2011)
B: B.Barnes, Longwood, Fla., US, 2007
Nominant: B.Barnes
Registrant: B.Barnes, 13. 9. 2010
HC: Registered 3. 4. 2011 {JS}
Description: Carniv.Pl.Newslett.40:26 (2011)
"All of the resulting seedlings immediately showed hybrid vigor, along with the combined traits of the parents in various degrees of intensity. (...) an all-red hirsute form which greatly favored the [Drosera kenneallyi {Lowrie}] parent, ([Drosera ' Woolly Red ' {B.Barnes}])"
Standard: Carniv.Pl.Newslett.40:26 (fig.6 right) (2011)
Propagation: vegetative propagation by leaf cuttings and division
Etymology: after visible attributes of the plants
image: Check Bob Ziemer's Photo Finder