Query results: All matching fields


F: +[Cephalotaceae {Dumort.}]

TF: [Cephalotus {Labill.}]

G: +[Cephalotus {Labill.}]

P: Nov.Holl.Pl.Spec.2:6 (1806)
TG: [Cephalotus follicularis {Labill.}]
N: +[Cephalotus follicularis {Labill.}]
P: Nov.Holl.Pl.Spec.2:7 (1806)
T: Van Leuwin Land, Esperance Bay, W.A., AU, 1792, J.Labillardere s.n. (P)
CLA: ROS-OXA-CEP-CEP-CEP-CEP
L: W AU
LFR:135:Southwest Australia
RLC: LR (nt)
XN: 20 {Kondo}
XNP: Bull.Torr.Bot.Cl.96:324 (1969)
image: cephalot/0041: Botanical line drawing
image: cephalot/isao86: multiple views of traps
image: cephalot/ceph: closeup of trap
image: cephalot/plant1: several pitchers
image: cephalot/sl_k24: plant in cultivation
image: cephalot/sl_bi17: plant in habitat
image: cephalot/CAB1: View of pitcher and flower bud
image: cephalot/CephalotusX2: multiple views of pitcher
image: Check Bob Ziemer's Photo Finder
N: $[Cephalotus ' Clayton's T Rex ' {C.Clayton}]
P: Carniv.Pl.Newslett.42:145 (2013)
S: =[Cephalotus follicularis {Labill.}]
B: C.Clayton, Triffid Park, AU, 2007
Nominant: C.Clayton, 2007
Registrant: C.Clayton, 12. 6. 2013
HC: Registered 26. 12. 2013 {JS}
Description: Carniv.Pl.Newslett.42:145 (2013)
"[Cephalotus ' Clayton's T Rex ' {C.Clayton}] is the cultivar with the largest and rarest of all the teratological traps, up to 5 cm long and 5 cm deep (Fig. 1). These grow horizontal, out from the crown, and their most distinguishing feature is the reverse or 45deg backward sloping pitcher. Rather than having a lid, it has what can only be described as horns; these seldom open however. Teratological traps are produced along with the normal carnivorous traps. However, when grown commercially, under controlled conditions at Triffid Park, these will grow at any time of the year. At the time of writing, it is not known if the teratological leaves/traps are carnivorous or not. They are long lasting, and will persist for 12 months or more. The clone is stable in cultivation, but only produces teratological traps rarely. Propagation is by any of the standard vegetative techniques used for [Cephalotus follicularis {Labill.}] including tissue culture."
Standard: Carniv.Pl.Newslett.42:145, fig.1 (2013)
Propagation: vegetative
Etymology: after breeder and because it is the "undisputed king" of the teratological leaved [Cephalotus follicularis {Labill.}].
image: Check Bob Ziemer's Photo Finder
N: $[Cephalotus ' Donna's Destiny ' {C.Clayton}]
P: Cephalotus Teratol.Abnorm.L.:21 (2011)
S: =[Cephalotus follicularis {Labill.}]
B: C.Clayton, Triffid Park, AU, 2007
Nominant: C.Clayton, 2007
Registrant: C.Clayton, 29. 5. 2007
HC: Registered 11. 6. 2013 {JS}
Description: Cephalotus Teratol.Abnorm.L.:21 (2011)
"[Cephalotus ' Donna's Destiny ' {C.Clayton}] (teratology) has an upright, open-ended, two horned, one keeled trap, which always faces out from the plant's crown. It is totally different from the normal [Cephalotus follicularis {Labill.}] carnivorous traps, or the non- carnivorous leaves.
Standard: Cephalotus Teratol.Abnorm.L.:21 (2011)
Propagation: vegetative
Etymology: after originator's daughter
image: Check Bob Ziemer's Photo Finder
N: $[Cephalotus ' Dudley Watts ' {S.Morley}]
P: Pl.Carniv.35(2):42 (2014)
S: =[Cephalotus follicularis {Labill.}]
B: D.Watts, UK, late 1980s
Nominant: S.Morley, Fangfoss, UK, 2013
Registrant: S.Morley, 2013
HC: Registered 24. 1. 2014 {JS}
Description: Pl.Carniv.35(2):42 (2014)
"The notable characteristics of this cultivar are the large, dark coloured pitchers and a chunky, thickened, "oversized" peristome; I measured the percentage of the total height of the pitcher occupied by the peristome on a [Cephalotus ' Dudley Watts ' {S.Morley}] pitcher, which is 17% of its height, whilst on a more typical plant it is 14%. The pitchers of large specimens of [Cephalotus ' Dudley Watts ' {S.Morley}] are slightly constricted towards the mouth and have a pronounced crinkled appearance at the front. See Figure 1. The pitcher I measured for reference for this description is 59mm high, which contrasts with a more typical-sized plant at only 35mm. See Figure 2. I have previously estimated the colour according to the RHS mini colour chart as corresponding to RHS 187A (dark purple brown), although colour will vary depending upon growing conditions.
Standard: Pl.Carniv.35(2):43 (fig.1) (2014)
Propagation: vegetative via leaf or rhizome cuttings or by division
Etymology: after originator
image: Check Bob Ziemer's Photo Finder
N: $[Cephalotus ' Eden Black ' {S.Morley}]
P: Carniv.Pl.Soc.J.(UK) 29:7 (2007)
S: =[Cephalotus follicularis {Labill.}]
B: S.Morley, Fangfoss, York, UK, late 1980s
Nominant: S.Morley
Registrant: S.Morley, 6. 1. 2007
HC: Registered 29. 7. 2007 {JS}
Description: Carniv.Pl.Soc.J.(UK) 29:7 (2007)
"The most notable characteristic of this cultivar is the darkly coloured pitchers. I refer to them as black, which is possibly what some might call artistic licence, but but they are certainly as black as many darkly coloured plants of popular garden plant species given the same description; they are probably best described as dark purple. I find it almost impossible to capture accurately the colour in any photograph, although photos give an impression of the colour, hence I will refer to colour using standard colours from the RHS colour chart. To be specific they correspond to the RHS mini colour chart colour RHS 200A (dark brown) when fully coloured. See Figure 1 which shows a fully coloured pitcher. In contrast my "Dudley Watts" clone has pitcher colour corresponding to RHS 187A (dark purple brown). The peristome of [Cephalotus 'Eden Black ' {S.Morley}] darkens quickly in full sun and the rest of the pitcher follows suit, with the pitcher eventually assuming virtually the same colour as the peristome; this is unlike any other [Cephalotus {Labill.}] I grow, where the pitchers are usually a hue lighter than the peristome. The dark colour spreads to both the outer and inner surfaces of the lid, even suffusing the windows with colour. The inner collar of the pitcher also becomes a dull purple colour in parts. The pitchers are on the large side, and are at least as big as my "Dudley Watts" pitchers at 5 cm, although they are getting bigger every year; the plant produced flower buds in 2005 for the first time, but is possibly not yet fully mature. The pitchers are elegant, long, relatively smooth and more-or-less straight-sided, lacking very crinkly pitchers characterising some of the clones available in cultivation. They have a well-formed peristome and a wide mouth; here they differ from the "Dudley Watts" clone which is noticeably constricted towards the mouth with a chunky, thickened peristome. The plant is rather shy in producing non-carnivorous leaves, a trait it shares with my "vigorous clumping" clone, which is a super characteristic for the grower but not terribly conductive to propagation from leaf cuttings (non-carnivorous leaves are usually easier to root)!"
Standard: Carniv.Pl.J.(UK)29:8, fig.1 (2007)
Propagation: vegetatively via leaf or rhizome cuttings or by division
Etymology: after originator's house name and pitcher colour
image: Check Bob Ziemer's Photo Finder
N: $[Cephalotus ' Hummer's Giant ' {J.Hummer}]
P: Carniv.Pl.Newslett.29:119 (2000)
PW: www.carnivorousplants.org/cpn/Species/v29n4p116_122.html#hummers
S: =[Cephalotus follicularis {Labill.}]
B: J.Hummer, Arlington, VA, USA, 9. 1986
Nominant: J.Hummer, 3. 4. 2000
Registrant: J.Hummer, 10. 5. 2000
HC: Registered 29. 1. 2001 {JS}
Description: Carniv.Pl.Newslett.29:119 (2000)
"This particular clone produces pitcher leaves up to 6 (-8) cm (2.5-3 inches) in length and about 2.5 cm (1 inch) in width. It usually takes about three years for plantlets grown from leaf cuttings to reach maturity and full size. (...) Since at maturity this clone reaches much larger sizes than normal [Cephalotus {Labill.}] plants in cultivation, I am establishing it as a cultivar (...)."
Standard: Carniv.Pl.Newslett.29:120 (2000)
Propagation: vegetative only
Etymology: after originator and size of the plants
image: Check Bob Ziemer's Photo Finder
N: $[Cephalotus ' Jason's Arks ' {C.Clayton}]
P: Cephalotus Teratol.Abnorm.L.:23 (2011)
S: =[Cephalotus follicularis {Labill.}]
B: C.Clayton, Triffid Park, AU, 2007
Nominant: C.Clayton, 2007
Registrant: C.Clayton, 29. 5. 2007
HC: Registered 11. 6. 2013 {JS}
Description: Cephalotus Teratol.Abnorm.L.:23 (2011)
"[Cephalotus ' Jason's Arks ' {C.Clayton}] (teratologies) are small, boat shaped, horizontal shaped leaves or traps; the depression always facing upwards. These leaves/traps don't appear to be fixed, but are variable. Some have a simple depression in the upper leaf surface. However, there appears to be a full spectrum of leaf shapes with others terminating in a quite deep complex trap. Yes a trap. One glance at a range of these leaves/traps, and there before you, eons of evolution. One mystery remains - why are they so small? We can only speculate that this tiny size was what [Cephalotus follicularis {Labill.}] ancestors looked like, before they became fully carnivorous and giganticized with their new nutrient rich diet. One thing that all these leaves/traps have in common, is that they are small, 1 or 2cm long. (...) The (teratological) leaves/traps are long lasting and will persist for 12 months or more. They are stable in cultivation and readily produce [Cephalotus ' Jason's Arks ' {C.Clayton}] (teratological) leaves/traps. Propagation is by any of the standard vegetative techniques used for [Cephalotus follicularis {Labill.}] including tissue culture."
Standard: Cephalotus Teratol.Abnorm.L.:23 (2011)
Propagation: vegetative
Etymology: after originator's boat-loving son-in-law
image: Check Bob Ziemer's Photo Finder
N: $[Cephalotus ' Tina's Hallelujah Trumpets ' {C.Clayton}]
P: Cephalotus Teratol.Abnorm.L.:22 (2011)
S: =[Cephalotus follicularis {Labill.}]
B: C.Clayton, Triffid Park, AU, 2007
Nominant: C.Clayton, 2007
Registrant: C.Clayton, 29. 5. 2007
HC: Registered 11. 6. 2013 {JS}
Description: Cephalotus Teratol.Abnorm.L.:22 (2011)
"[Cephalotus ' Tina's Hallelujah Trumpets ' {C.Clayton}] (teratologies) are produced at random, interspersed between the seasonal growing of the non-carnivorous leaves, and the carnivorous traps. At the time of writing, it is not known if these trumpets are carnivorous, but I suspect that they are.
Standard: Cephalotus Teratol.Abnorm.L.:22 (2011)
Propagation: vegetative
Etymology: after originator's wife and because it heralds a new beginning for [Cephalotus follicularis {Labill.}], and after the teratology's trumpet-like shape
image: Check Bob Ziemer's Photo Finder
VN: ["West Australian pitcher plant" {}]
S: see Cephalotus